A Meditation for Settling Your Busy Mind

Psychiatrist and mindfulness expert Holly Rogers explains why you should not even try to stop your thoughts. Plus, a guided practice on noticing your inner chatter with curiosity rather than judgment.

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Today we are going to practice noticing and working with our busy minds. As we begin this meditation I’m going to share with you the single most important bit of information that I believe will help you as you develop and deepen your meditation practice. 

Are you ready? Here it is. 

When you settle into your meditation practice, bringing your awareness to the sensations of your breath, don’t expect to and don’t even try to stop your thoughts. Trying to stop your thoughts is not really possible and it often leads to a great deal of frustration. Frustration that might make you doubt your ability to develop a mindfulness meditation practice.

Rather than trying to stop your thoughts, work on changing your relationship to your thoughts.

Rather than trying to stop your thoughts, work on changing your relationship to your thoughts. Your minds are thought-producing machines. They’re constantly producing a river of thoughts. This river flows on and on, and sometimes it’s moving really fast, yet sometimes it slows down. Sometimes there are funny little eddies in the river, swirls of thoughts that go round and round. Rather than being in this river of thought, lost in it, carried downstream,…

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