Author: Sharon Begley

Sharon Begley

Sharon Begley is a senior science writer with The Boston Globe Media Group, author of Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain, and coauthor with Richard Davidson of The Emotional Life of Your Brain. She writes a regular column for Mindful magazine called Brain Science.

Puzzle pieces with happy faces
Magazine

Why is it that we seem to get along with some people right off the bat? Is it just because you happen to like the same kind of music, or are there deeper reasons to find yourself on the same wavelength?

birthday cakes in row
Living

Some scientists are working on making the last stages of life a little healthier, others are trying to extend life, and still others are hoping to make death obsolete.

Living

DNA determines much of who we are, but it’s not fixed for life. Our behavior and environment can effect alterations to genes for good or ill. Can meditating affect us at a genetic level?

illustration of mirror with lipstick kisses on it
Living

Narcissism has fascinated and bedeviled researchers for decades. While people encountering them may consider it a disorder, narcissists themselves are quite content with their gargantuan self-regard.

weighing heart and brain on scale
Living

IQ points keep rising with each generation, but the tests are leaving out emotional intelligence, creativity, and wisdom—the very traits we need to solve our most pressing problems.

houses talking to each other, with speech bubbles overhead
Magazine

What we humans believe has always been shaped by the group we identify with. In the age of filter bubbles, the habit of looking to our tribe for all the answers may be escalating.

illustration man with search bar over his head
Living

We still call them “phones,” but they are seldom used for talking. They have become like a substitute for memory—and other brain functions. Is that good for us in the long run?

illustration person standing under wave
Living

Though we often equate compulsions and addictions, researchers are now drawing a sharp distinction between these two behaviors—one is about avoiding and the other about seeking.

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