Magazine

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Features

When your mind spins and your body itches to do something, anything, what’s really going on? Meditation is a great way to find out.

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Magazine

Thoughts are not your enemy while you meditate. Some of our best ideas can make themselves known when you take time to pause and notice them—the trick is not to court them.

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Living

Proponents of mindfulness meditation repeatedly celebrate living in the now, but being able to forestall gratification to a future time can also be a key element of mindfulness.

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Features

We don’t meditate to become better meditators. We meditate so we can bring mindfulness out into the real world, and thrive in our interactions with others.

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Features

“What’s going on in that head of yours?” How many adults have asked an adolescent some form of that question? In his book, Brainstorm, a New York Times bestseller, Dr. Dan Siegel decided to go a step further and actually answer that question. The results are surprising—and very exciting.